Identifying health information technology needs of oncologists to facilitate the adoption of genomic medicine: Recommendations from the 2016 American society of clinical oncology omics and precision Oncology workshop

Kevin S. Hughes, Edward P. Ambinder, Gregory P. Hess, Peter Paul Yu, Elmer V. Bernstam, Mark J. Routbort, Jean Rene Clemenceau, John T. Hamm, Phillip G. Febbo, Susan M. Domchek, James L. Chen, Jeremy L. Warner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

At the ASCO Data Standards and Interoperability Summit held in May 2016, it was unanimously decided that four areas of current oncology clinical practice have serious, unmet health information technology needs. The following areas of need were identified: 1) omics and precision oncology, 2) advancing interoperability, 3) patient engagement, and 4) value-based oncology. To begin to address these issues, ASCO convened two complementary workshops: the Omics and Precision Oncology Workshop in October 2016 and the Advancing Interoperability Workshop in December 2016. A common goal was to address the complexity, enormity, and rapidly changing nature of genomic information, which existing electronic health records are ill equipped to manage. The subject matter experts invited to the Omics and Precision Oncology Workgroup were tasked with the responsibility of determining a specific, limited need that could be addressed by a software application (app) in the short-term future, using currently available genomic knowledge bases. Hence, the scope of this workshop was to determine the basic functionality of one app that could serve as a test case for app development. The goal of the second workshop, described separately, was to identify the specifications for such an app. This approach was chosen both to facilitate the development of a useful app and to help ASCO and oncologists better understand the mechanics, difficulties, and gaps in genomic clinical decision support tool development. In this article, we discuss the key challenges and recommendations identified by the workshop participants. Our hope is to narrow the gap between the practicing oncologist and ongoing national efforts to provide precision oncology and value-based care to cancer patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3153-3159
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume35
Issue number27
DOIs
StatePublished - 20 Sep 2017
Externally publishedYes

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