I-PSI: Short- and Long-Term Efficacy of a Comprehensive Initiative to Promote Patient Safety Event Reporting by Trainees

Vinay Prabhu, Mark Mikhly, Ryan Chung, Donna P. Phillips, Katherine A. Hochman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Despite benefits of safety event reporting, few are trainee initiated. A comprehensive intervention was created to increase trainee reporting, partnering a trainee safety council with high-level faculty. Data were collected for 12 months pre intervention and 30 months post intervention, including short-term (1-12 mo) and long-term (13-30 mo) follow-up. A total of 2337 trainee events were submitted over the study period, primarily communication-related (40%) and on the medicine service (39%). Monthly submissions increased from 29.3 pre intervention to 66.2, 77.7, and 58.6 events/mo at post intervention, short-term follow-up, and long-term follow-up, respectively (P < 0.001). Proportion of hospital events submitted by trainees increased from 2.3% pre intervention to 4.1%, 4.9%, and 3.6% at post intervention, short-term, and long-term follow-up, respectively (P < 0.001). Trainee monthly submissions (P = 0.015) and proportion of hospital events (P < 0.001) declined from short- to long-term follow-up. Low- and intermediate-level harm events significantly increased post intervention (P < 0.001) while high-level events did not (P = 0.15-1.0). Our comprehensive intervention increased trainee event submissions at long-term follow-up.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)72-80
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Quality
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2022

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