Human diploid cell culture rabies vaccine (HDCV) and purified chick embryo cell culture rabies vaccine (PCECV) both confer protective immunity against infection with the silver-haired bat rabies virus strain (SHBRV)

Bernhard Dietzschold, D. Craig Hooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

The demonstration of extensive differences in the antigenic makeups of the silver-haired bat rabies virus (SHBRV) and canine rabies virus (COSRV) strains raised concerns as to whether current licensed rabies vaccines are sufficiently protective against SHBRV. NIH mouse protection test results show that both the human diploid cell culture rabies vaccine (HDCV) and the purified chicken embryo cell rabies vaccine (PCECV) protected against lethal infection with SHBRV as well as the canine rabies strain COSRV. However, in this investigation, the potencies of both vaccines in mice were found to be significantly higher for COSRV than for SHBRV. The in vivo protection data are confirmed by in vitro virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) test results which demonstrate that mice immunized with HDCV or PCECV develop significantly higher ViVA titres against COSRV than against SHBRV. In contrast, VNA tests of sera from individuals immunized with HDCV or PCECV showed that humans, as opposed to mice, develop significantly higher VNA titres against SHBRV than against COSRV. These data suggest that HDCV and PCECV will protect humans against infection with the silver-haired bat rabies virus strain in addition to canine rabies virus strains.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1656-1659
Number of pages4
JournalVaccine
Volume16
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bat rabies virus
  • Human rabies vaccines
  • Protective immunity

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