High normal blood pressure is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease among middle-aged but not in elderly populations: 9-year results of a population-based study

F. Hadaegh, R. Mohebi, D. Khalili, M. Hasheminia, F. Sheikholeslami, F. Azizi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Data are conflicting and sparse regarding the impact of high normal blood pressure (BP) (systolic BP (SBP) of 130-139 mm Hg or diastolic BP (DBP) of 85-89 mm Hg) on incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) among middle-aged vs elderly population. We examined the risk of BP categories among 6273 participants ≥30 years, free of CVD at baseline, during more than 9.3 years follow-up. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of CVD for normal BP group (SBP between 120-129 mm Hg or DBP between 80-85 mm Hg), high normal BP group and hypertension group (SBP≥140 mm Hg or DBP≥90 mm Hg or taking antihypertensive drugs), considering those with optimal BP (SBP<120 mm Hg and DBP<80 mm Hg) as reference. During follow-up, 512 CVD events occurred. There was significant interaction between age and BP categories (P=0.028) in prediction of CVD. In multivariate analysis, HRs (95% CIs) of CVD were 1.62 (1.11-2.37) and 2.20 (1.57-3.09) for middle aged with high normal and hypertensive BP groups, respectively. Among elderly (≥60 years), HR was 2.09 (1.36-3.21) only for hypertensive ones. High normal BP is a risk factor for incident of CVD only among middle-aged population. Furthermore, the effect of hypertension on incident CVD was stronger among younger population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)18-23
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Human Hypertension
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • cardiovascular disease
  • elderly
  • middle age
  • prehypertension

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