Healthcare-Associated Mycobacterium chimaera Infection Subsequent to Heater-Cooler Device Exposure During Cardiac Surgery

Allen Ninh, Menachem Weiner, Andrew Goldberg

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

A SERIES of reports in the United States and Europe have linked Mycobacterium chimaera infections to contaminated heater-cooler devices used during cardiac surgery. Heater-cooler devices commonly are used for cardiopulmonary bypass during cardiac surgery. M. chimaera is a slow-growing nontuberculous mycobacterium that has been shown to cause cardiac complications that can lead to fatal disease following cardiac surgery. Given that more than 250,000 cardiothoracic surgical procedures requiring cardiopulmonary bypass take place each year in the United States, the estimated number of patient exposures to M. chimaera has prompted a public health crisis. The goal of this review is to summarize the present status of the M. chimaera outbreak and provide cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiac anesthesiologists, and other clinicians with current approaches to patient management and to discuss risk mitigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1831-1835
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2017

Keywords

  • Mycobacterium chimaera
  • aerosolized bacteria
  • cardiac surgery
  • cardiopulmonary bypass
  • heater-cooler-associated infections

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Healthcare-Associated Mycobacterium chimaera Infection Subsequent to Heater-Cooler Device Exposure During Cardiac Surgery'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this