Health Care Transition for Adolescents and Young Adults with Pediatric-Onset Liver Disease and Transplantation: A Position Paper by the North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

Jennifer Vittorio, Beverly Kosmach-Park, Lindsay Y. King, Ryan Fischer, Emily M. Fredericks, Vicky L. Ng, Amrita Narang, Sara Rasmussen, John Bucuvalas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Advances in medical therapies and liver transplantation have resulted in a greater number of pediatric patients reaching young adulthood. However, there is an increased risk for medical complications and morbidity surrounding transfer from pediatric to adult hepatology and transplant services. Health care transition (HCT) is the process of moving from a child/family-centered model of care to an adult or patient-centered model of health care. Successful HCT requires a partnership between pediatric and adult providers across all disciplines resulting in a transition process that does not end at the time of transfer but continues throughout early adulthood. Joint consensus guidelines in collaboration with the American Society of Transplantation are presented to facilitate the adoption of a structured, multidisciplinary approach to transition planning utilizing The Six Core Elements of Health Care TransitionTMfor use by both pediatric and adult specialists. This paper provides guidance and seeks support for the implementation of an HCT program which spans across both pediatric and adult hepatology and transplant centers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)84-101
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Volume76
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2023

Keywords

  • emerging adulthood
  • nonadherence
  • transfer of care
  • transitions of care

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