Head and Neck Cancer Stage at Presentation and Survival Outcomes Among Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Patients Compared With Asian and White Patients

Peter Kim Moon, Yifei Ma, Uchechukwu C. Megwalu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Importance: Research studies often group Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander individuals together with Asian individuals despite being consistently identified as having worse health outcomes and higher rates of comorbidities and mortality. Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander individuals also have high incidence rates of oral cavity and pharyngeal cancer compared with the general population; however, disparities in clinical presentation and survival outcomes of head and neck cancer squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) among this population have not been investigated nor compared with those of other races. Objective: To determine the association of race with cancer stage at diagnosis and survival outcomes among Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander patients with HNSCC compared with Asian and non-Hispanic White patients. Design, Setting, and Participants: This was a retrospective population-based cohort study using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 18 database. Asian, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, and non-Hispanic White adult patients diagnosed in 1988 through 2015 with HNSCC of the oral cavity, oropharynx, nasopharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx were included; any patient whose record was missing data on disease or demographic information was excluded. Main Outcomes and Measures: Cancer stage at presentation was compared among Asian, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, and non-Hispanic White patients using a multivariable logistic regression model. Survival outcomes were compared among these racial groups using Cox regression models. Data analyses were performed from July 1, 2021, to March 20, 2022. Results: The total study population comprised 76 473 patients: 4894 Asian (mean [SD] age at presentation, 60.7 [14.6] years), 469 Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander (57.8 [12.3] years), and 71 110 non-Hispanic White (62.2 [12.1] years) individuals. Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander patients were more likely to present with advanced-stage HNSCC (odds ratio [OR], 1.38; 95% CI, 1.12-1.72) compared with non-Hispanic White patients. Asian patients presented with similar stage disease (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.97-1.11) compared with non-Hispanic White patients. Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander patients had worse disease-specific survival (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.02-1.36) compared with non-Hispanic White patients after adjusting for clinical and demographic factors. In contrast, Asian patients had improved disease-specific survival (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.88-0.98) compared with non-Hispanic White patients. Conclusions and Relevance: This retrospective population-based cohort study suggests that Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander race was associated with more advanced HNSCC, and worse disease-specific survival compared with non-Hispanic White race, while Asian race was associated with improved survival. This study highlights the importance of disaggregating Asian from Pacific Islander data when assessing health disparities, and the need for culturally sensitive interventions to promote earlier detection of head and neck cancer and improved survival among the Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)636-645
Number of pages10
JournalJAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume148
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2022
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Head and Neck Cancer Stage at Presentation and Survival Outcomes Among Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Patients Compared With Asian and White Patients'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this