Gene therapy delivery systems for enhancing viral and nonviral vectors for cardiac diseases: Current concepts and future applications

Michael G. Katz, Anthony S. Fargnoli, Richard D. Williams, Charles R. Bridges

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

Gene therapy is one of the most promising fields for developing new treatments for the advanced stages of ischemic and monogenetic, particularly autosomal or X-linked recessive, cardiomyopathies. The remarkable ongoing efforts in advancing various targets have largely been inspired by the results that have been achieved in several notable gene therapy trials, such as the hemophilia B and Leber's congenital amaurosis. Rate-limiting problems preventing successful clinical application in the cardiac disease area, however, are primarily attributable to inefficient gene transfer, host responses, and the lack of sustainable therapeutic transgene expression. It is arguable that these problems are directly correlated with the choice of vector, dose level, and associated cardiac delivery approach as a whole treatment system. Essentially, a delicate balance exists in maximizing gene transfer required for efficacy while remaining within safety limits. Therefore, the development of safe, effective, and clinically applicable gene delivery techniques for selected nonviral and viral vectors will certainly be invaluable in obtaining future regulatory approvals. The choice of gene transfer vector, dose level, and the delivery system are likely to be critical determinants of therapeutic efficacy. It is here that the interactions between vector uptake and trafficking, delivery route means, and the host's physical limits must be considered synergistically for a successful treatment course.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)914-927
Number of pages14
JournalHuman Gene Therapy
Volume24
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2013
Externally publishedYes

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