Gastroesophageal reflux disease increases infant acute respiratory illness severity, but not childhood asthma

Robert S. Valet, Kecia N. Carroll, Tebeb Gebretsadik, Patricia A. Minton, Kimberly B. Woodward, Zhouwen Liu, Tina V. Hartert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

It is unknown whether gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) during infancy affects infant bronchiolitis severity or childhood asthma inception. Four hundred thirty-two infants presenting with acute respiratory illness due to bronchiolitis or upper respiratory infection were studied. The primary exposure was the parental report of a previous GERD diagnosis. Outcomes included bronchiolitis severity at initial presentation and childhood asthma diagnosis at age 4. Infants with parentally reported GERD had a higher bronchiolitis severity score (range=0-12, clinically significant difference=0.5), indicating more severe disease, than infants without reported GERD (median 5.5 [interquartile range 3.5-9.0] among those with reported GERD versus 4.0 [1.0-7.0] among those without, P=0.005). This association persisted after adjusting for infant age, race, gender, and secondhand smoke exposure by a propensity score (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.99, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14-3.46, P=0.02). The parental report of GERD during infancy was not associated with the parental report of asthma diagnosis at age 4. GERD during infancy may contribute to acute respiratory illness severity, but is not associated with asthma diagnosis at age 4. Future prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-33
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric, Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2014
Externally publishedYes

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