For preventive medicine to include oral health care, the dental profession, licensing agencies, payers, and the public must effect change

Donald B. Giddon, Leon A. Assael

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dentistry is represented to the US public in large part by the various professional associations, which speak for the interests of general and specialized dentists, mostly in private proprietary practice. Unfortunately, the interests of dental professional associations may often be in conflict with those of the public. To resolve this continued disparity, it behooves the dental leadership to become more involved with the overall health care system than continuing to enhance the economic interests of the profession without sufficient regard for the world-wide burden of unmet dental needs. An assessment of policy failures is provided with some recommendations for greater involvement of organized dentistry in the integration of oral and general health care. Dentistry must recommit itself to being a health profession rather focusing on the business aspects of health care. Another aspect to be considered is a reorganization of the American Dental Association to better represent the oral health care workforce.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)200-204
Number of pages5
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume114
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Dentistry
  • Health care delivery
  • Health care reform
  • Professional organizations

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