Examining the effectiveness of an opt-in approach to prenatal human immunodeficiency virus screening

Christopher V. Almario, Eric J. Moskowitz, Jeanette Koran, Bettina Berman, Valerie P. Pracilio, Albert Crawford, Jason K. Baxter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: We sought to determine the prenatal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening rate when using an opt-in policy and to find variables predictive of screening. Study Design: This was a case-control study examining gravid women with a prenatal visit and a delivery at our hospital in 2005. Cases were defined as women who did not undergo HIV screening during the first or second prenatal visit. Our institution used an opt-in approach to HIV screening. Results: Overall, 71% (291/412) of women underwent HIV screening at the first or second prenatal visit. Patient refusal was the most common reason for not being screened (15%; 62/412). Women who were ≤25 years old, were unmarried, and received care from maternal-fetal medicine attendings or family practitioners were more likely to undergo HIV screening. Conclusion: With an opt-in approach, 29% of women were not screened for HIV during their early prenatal care. An opt-in policy also leads to screening rates that are provider dependent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159.e1-159.e6
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume202
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • opt-in human immunodeficiency virus screening
  • prenatal screening
  • sexually transmitted disease

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