Examining differences in attentional bias to smoking-related cues among black and white cigarette smokers: An event-related potential pilot study

Lesia M. Ruglass, James C. Root, Naomi Dambreville, Alina Shevorykin, Christine E. Sheffer, Robert D. Melara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Black cigarette smokers experience higher craving, lower cessation rates, and increased health complications from tobacco use than Whites. We examined psychophysiological and behavioral differences in attentional bias to smoking cues between Black and White smokers. Thirty-one participants (Blacks, n = 20; MAge = 45 and Whites, n = 11, MAge = 47.64) discriminated line orientations while ignoring temporally flanking lines and smoking-related, positive-, negative-, and neutral-images as behavioral responses and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. Results revealed a three-way interaction in reaction time among Group (White, Black), Congruity (congruent vs. incongruent flankers) and Cue (smoking-related, positive, negative) factors, F(2,58) = 3.63, p =.03, MSe =.001, η2 =.002. Smoking-related cues yielded the largest congruity effects in Whites, but the smallest congruity effects in Blacks. Random presentation of smoking-related cues (re: baseline) weakened P1 ERP amplitude (125 ms after stimulus onset) in Whites, but not Blacks (Cue x Group x Task, F(3,87) = 3.44, p <.05, MSe = 65.96, η2 =.01), suggesting an early sensory effect of smoking cues in Whites. The difference between Whites and Blacks in P2 amplitude (226 ms; amplitude weaker in Whites) was greatest to the smoking-related cues (Cue x Group, F(3,87) = 2.81, p <.05, MSe = 60.68, η2 =.01), indicating a stronger draw in attention from smoking cues in Whites. Findings suggest White and Black smokers respond differently to smoking-related cues during early sensory processing. Findings need to be replicated.

Original languageEnglish
Article number135241
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume735
DOIs
StatePublished - 14 Sep 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Attentional bias
  • Cigarette smokers
  • Cue reactivity
  • Event-related potential

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