Evidence behind the use of molecular tests in melanocytic lesions and practice patterns of these tests by dermatopathologists

Patrick O. Emanuel, Aleodor A. Andea, Claudia I. Vidal, Tricia A. Missall, Roberto A. Novoa, Angela K. Bohlke, Sarah R. Hughes, Maria Y. Hurley, Jinah Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The gold standard for the diagnosis of melanocytic lesions is histologic examination. However, as histologic examination can have its limitations, there are many clinical scenarios in which additional testing may be appropriate in an attempt to render a definitive diagnosis. Methods: A literature review for three ancillary tests—comparative genomic hybridization (CGH)/single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and gene expression profiling by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR)—was compiled and current use patterns were tabulated. Survey of the practice patterns of these tests by dermatopathologists was also accessed in the attendees of the American Society of Dermatopathology Annual Meeting (Chicago, 2016). Results: Here we summarize the use of these molecular tests in melanocytic lesions. We found that 54.4% of the respondents surveyed utilize (or expect consultants to utilize) molecular testing of melanocytic lesions in their practice when appropriate. Conclusions: CGH/SNP arrays, FISH testing, and qRT-PCR applied to melanocytic lesions have allowed for more accurate classification. Just over half of those surveyed use molecular testing for melanocytic lesion with the majority sending their cases out for completion of the molecular test.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)839-846
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cutaneous Pathology
Volume45
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • chain reaction
  • comparative genomic hybridization
  • fluorescence in situ hybridization
  • gene expression profiling by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase
  • melanocytic lesions
  • single-nucleotide polymorphism

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Evidence behind the use of molecular tests in melanocytic lesions and practice patterns of these tests by dermatopathologists'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this