Epidemiologic trends of domestic violence–related ocular injuries among pediatric patients: data from the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample 2008-2017

Joana E. Andoh, Sofia Miguez, Sarah E. Andoh, Sumarth Mehta, Tahreem A. Mir, Evan M. Chen, Srimathy Jain, Christopher C. Teng, Kristen Nwanyanwu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To study the epidemiology of all domestic violence (DV)–related ocular injuries among pediatric emergency department (ED) patients in the United States. Methods: This is a retrospective, cross-sectional study of isolated children (<18 years of age) with a diagnosis of DV and primary or secondary diagnosis of ocular injuries in the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample, 2008-2017. We calculated annual incidence of DV-related ocular injuries and prevalence by demographic variables, including age, sex, and income quartile. Median charges, median length of inpatient hospital stay, and factors associated with hospitalization were also measured. Results: From 2008 to 2017, there were 4,125 ED encounters, with an average incidence of 0.56 per 100,000 population (males, 50.0%; mean age [SE], 9.2 [0.3]). Patients in the lowest income quartile (42.6%) and with Medicaid insurance (63.2%) were the most prevalent. The most common known perpetrator was a family member (29.4%). Most ED encounters took place at southern regional (28.6%), metropolitan teaching (67.1%) and designated trauma hospitals (57.8%). Contusion of the eye/adnexa and being struck by or against an object were the most common ocular diagnosis and known mechanism of injury, respectively. An estimated 12.4% of patients were admitted with a median hospital stay of 4 (IQR, 2-6). Median charges during the study period were $27,415.10 (IQR, $13,142.70-$54,454.90). Conclusions: DV-related ocular injuries were most prevalent among patients with a low socioeconomic status. Given the historical underreporting of DV, future studies are warranted to identify more specific social determinants of health that contribute to such presentations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335.e1-335.e8
JournalJournal of AAPOS
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2023
Externally publishedYes

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