Emerging Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques for Atherosclerosis Imaging: High Magnetic Field, Relaxation Time Mapping, and Fluorine-19 Imaging

Rob C.I. Wüst, Claudia Calcagno, Mariah R.R. Daal, Aart J. Nederveen, Bram F. Coolen, Gustav J. Strijkers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Atherosclerosis is a prevalent disease affecting a large portion of the population at one point in their lives. There is an unmet need for noninvasive diagnostics to identify and characterize at-risk plaque phenotypes noninvasively and in vivo, to improve the stratification of patients with cardiovascular disease, and for treatment evaluation. Magnetic resonance imaging is uniquely positioned to address these diagnostic needs. However, currently available magnetic resonance imaging methods for vessel wall imaging lack sufficient discriminative and predictive power to guide the individual patient needs. To address this challenge, physicists are pushing the boundaries of magnetic resonance atherosclerosis imaging to increase image resolution, provide improved quantitative evaluation of plaque constituents, and obtain readouts of disease activity such as inflammation. Here, we review some of these important developments, with specific focus on emerging applications using high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the use of quantitative relaxation parameter mapping for improved plaque characterization, and novel 19F magnetic resonance imaging technology to image plaque inflammation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)841-849
Number of pages9
JournalArteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
Volume39
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2019

Keywords

  • atherosclerosis
  • fluorine
  • inflammation
  • magnetic resonance imaging

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