Electrocardiographic ST-T area assessed by a computerized quantitative method and its relation to cardiovascular events: The J-HOP study

Satoshi Hoshide, Tomoyuki Kabutoya, Tatsuya Yoneyama, Kyohei Fukatani, Kazuomi Kario

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1 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND Although many studies have reported that the presence of minor or major ST-T change of electrocardiography (ECG) was associated with a risk of cardiovascular events, it is not clear whether there is a difference in the prognostic power depending on the summation of ST-T area (ST-T area ) assessed by a quantitative method. METHODS Electrocardiograms were performed in 834 clinical patients with one or more cardiovascular risks. ST-T area was assessed as the area enclosed by the baseline from the end of the QRS complex to the end of the ST-T segment using a computerized quantitative method. We used the lower magnitude of ST-T area in the V5 or V6 lead for the analysis. RESULTS After a mean follow-up 8.4 ± 2.9 years (7,001 person-years), there were 92 cardiovascular events. With adjustment for covariates, the results from Cox proportional hazards models (Model 1) suggested that the lowest quartile of ST-T area was associated with a higher risk for cardiovascular outcome compared with the remaining quartile groups (hazard ratio, 2.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.36-3.16, P < 0.01). Even when adding the ECG left ventricular hypertrophy by Cornell voltage (Model 2) and Cornell product (Model 3) to Model 1, the significance remained (both P < 0.01). When we used ST-T area as a continuous variable substitute for the lowest quartile of ST-T area , these associations were similar in all models (all P < 0.01). CONCLUSION The lower summations of ST-T area assessed by a computerized quantitative method were associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease incidence in a clinical population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)282-288
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Hypertension
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 12 Feb 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • blood pressure
  • cardiovascular events
  • cardiovascular risk
  • clinical population
  • electrocardiography
  • hypertension

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