Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Attentional Bias to Methamphetamine Cues and Its Association With EEG-Derived Functional Brain Network Topology

Hassan Khajehpour, Muhammad A. Parvaz, Mayadeh Kouti, Taherehalsadat Hosseini Rafsanjani, Hamed Ekhtiari, Sepideh Bakht, Alireza Noroozi, Bahador Makkiabadi, Maryam Mahmoodi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Although transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has shown to potentially mitigate drug craving and attentional bias to drug-related stimuli, individual differences in such modulatory effects of tDCS are less understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate a source of the inter-subject variability in the tDCS effects that can be useful for tDCS-based treatments of individuals with methamphetamine (MA) use disorder (IMUD). Methods: Forty-two IMUD (all male) were randomly assigned to receive a single-session of either sham or real bilateral tDCS (anodal right/cathodal left) over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. The tDCS effect on MA craving and biased attention to drug stimuli were investigated by quantifying EEG-derived P3 (a measure of initial attentional bias) and late positive potential (LPP; a measure of sustained motivated attention) elicited by these stimuli. To assess the association of changes in P3 and LPP with brain connectivity network (BCN) topology, the correlation between topology metrics, specifically those related to the efficiency of information processing, and the tDCS effect was investigated. Results: The P3 amplitude significantly decreased following the tDCS session, whereas the amplitudes increased in the sham group. The changes in P3 amplitudes were significantly correlated with communication efficiency measured by BCN topology metrics (r = −0.47, P =.03; r = −0.49, P =.02). There was no significant change in LPP amplitude due to the tDCS application. Conclusions: These findings validate that tDCS mitigates initial attentional bias, but not the sustained motivated attention, to MA stimuli. Importantly, however, results also show that the individual differences in the effects of tDCS may be underpinned by communication efficiency of the BCN topology, and therefore, these BCN topology metrics may have the potential to robustly predict the effectiveness of tDCS-based interventions on MA craving and attentional bias to MA stimuli among IMUD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)631-644
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology
Volume25
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2022

Keywords

  • craving
  • event-related potentials
  • functional brain network topology
  • methamphetamine
  • tDCS

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