Effects of maternal dietary patterns during pregnancy on early childhood growth trajectories and obesity risk: The CANDLE study

Zunsong Hu, Frances A. Tylavsky, Mehmet Kocak, Jay H. Fowke, Joan C. Han, Robert L. Davis, Kaja Z. Lewinn, Nicole R. Bush, Sheela Sathyanarayana, Catherine J. Karr, Qi Zhao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

We investigated the associations between maternal dietary patterns during pregnancy and early childhood growth trajectories and overweight/obesity risk in offspring. Maternal diet was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire during the second trimester, and dietary patterns were derived by reduced rank regression. The associations between maternal dietary pattern scores and body mass index (BMI) trajectories from birth to age four (rising-high, moderate, and low BMI trajectories) as well as overweight/obesity risk at age four were analyzed (n = 1257). Two maternal dietary patterns were identified. The fast food pattern included a higher intake of fried chicken and fish, fruit juices, mayonnaise, and sugar-sweetened beverages, while the processed food pattern included a higher intake of dairy, salad dressing, processed meat, and cold breakfast cereal. Women with greater adherence to the fast food pattern were more likely to have children in the rising-high BMI trajectory group [OR (95% CI) = 1.32 (1.07–1.62); p = 0.008] or having overweight/obesity at age four [OR (95% CI) = 1.31 (1.11–1.54); p = 0.001]. The processed food pattern was not associated with these outcomes. The maternal dietary pattern during pregnancy represented by fried foods and sugar-sweetened beverages may contribute to rapid early childhood growth and increased risk for obesity in offspring.

Original languageEnglish
Article number465
JournalNutrients
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Childhood obesity
  • Fast food
  • Growth trajectory
  • Maternal dietary pattern
  • Pregnancy

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of maternal dietary patterns during pregnancy on early childhood growth trajectories and obesity risk: The CANDLE study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this