Effects of High-Flux Hemodialysis on Clinical Outcomes: Results of the HEMO Study

Alfred K. Cheung, Nathan W. Levin, Tom Greene, Lawrence Agodoa, James Bailey, Gerald Beck, William Clark, Andrew S. Levey, John K. Leypoldt, Daniel B. Ornt, Michael V. Rocco, Gerald Schulman, Steve Schwab, Brendan Teehan, Garabed Eknoyan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

240 Scopus citations

Abstract

Among the 1846 patients in the HEMO Study, chronic high-flux dialysis did not significantly affect the primary outcome of the all-cause mortality (ACM) rate or the main secondary composite outcomes, including the rates of first cardiac hospitalization or ACM, first infectious hospitalization or ACM, first 15% decrease in serum albumin levels or ACM, or all non-vascular access-related hospitalizations. The high-flux intervention, however, seemed to be associated with reduced risks of specific cardiac-related events. The relative risks (RR) for the high-flux arm, compared with the low-flux arm, were 0.80 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.65 to 0.99] for cardiac death and 0.87 (95% CI, 0. 76 to 1.00) for the composite of first cardiac hospitalization or cardiac death. Also, the effect of high-flux dialysis on ACM seemed to vary, depending on the duration of prior dialysis. This report presents secondary analyses to further explore the relationship between the flux intervention and the duration of dialysis with respect to various outcomes. The patients were stratified into a short-duration group and a long-duration group, on the basis of the mean duration of dialysis of 3.7 yr before randomization. In the subgroup that had been on dialysis for > 3.7 yr, randomization to high-flux dialysis was associated with lower risks of ACM (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.86; P = 0.001), the composite of first albumin level decrease or ACM (RR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.91; P = 0.005), and cardiac deaths (RR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.92; P = 0.016), compared with low-flux dialysis. No significant differences were observed in outcomes related to infection for either duration subgroup, however, and the trends for beneficial effects of high-flux dialysis on ACM rates were considerably weakened when the years of dialysis during the follow-up phase were combined with the prestudy years of dialysis in the analysis. For the subgroup of patients with < 3.7 yr of dialysis before the study, assignment to high-flux dialysis had no significant effect on any of the examined clinical outcomes. These data suggest that high-flux dialysis might have a beneficial effect on cardiac outcomes. Because these results are derived from multiple statistical comparisons, however, they must be interpreted with caution. The subgroup results that demonstrate that patients with different durations of dialysis are affected differently by high-flux dialysis are interesting and require further study for confirmation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3251-3263
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN
Volume14
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of High-Flux Hemodialysis on Clinical Outcomes: Results of the HEMO Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this