DPH1 syndrome: two novel variants and structural and functional analyses of seven missense variants identified in syndromic patients

Roser Urreizti, Klaus Mayer, Gilad D. Evrony, Edith Said, Laura Castilla-Vallmanya, Neal A.L. Cody, Guillem Plasencia, Bruce D. Gelb, Daniel Grinberg, Ulrich Brinkmann, Bryn D. Webb, Susanna Balcells

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

DPH1 variants have been associated with an ultra-rare and severe neurodevelopmental disorder, mainly characterized by variable developmental delay, short stature, dysmorphic features, and sparse hair. We have identified four new patients (from two different families) carrying novel variants in DPH1, enriching the clinical delineation of the DPH1 syndrome. Using a diphtheria toxin ADP-ribosylation assay, we have analyzed the activity of seven identified variants and demonstrated compromised function for five of them [p.(Leu234Pro); p.(Ala411Argfs*91); p.(Leu164Pro); p.(Leu125Pro); and p.(Tyr112Cys)]. We have built a homology model of the human DPH1–DPH2 heterodimer and have performed molecular dynamics simulations to study the effect of these variants on the catalytic sites as well as on the interactions between subunits of the heterodimer. The results show correlation between loss of activity, reduced size of the opening to the catalytic site, and changes in the size of the catalytic site with clinical severity. This is the first report of functional tests of DPH1 variants associated with the DPH1 syndrome. We demonstrate that the in vitro assay for DPH1 protein activity, together with structural modeling, are useful tools for assessing the effect of the variants on DPH1 function and may be used for predicting patient outcomes and prognoses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-75
Number of pages12
JournalEuropean Journal of Human Genetics
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2020

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