Does the morbidity of twin gestations after 36 weeks increase with advancing gestational age?

J. Stone, A. Bianco, C. J. Lockwood, R. L. Berkowitz, K. Eddleman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Given that fetal growth rates peak 4 weeks earlier in twin compared with singleton gestations and that the mean gestational age at delivery of twin gestations is reported to be 35-36 weeks, we postulated that postdates morbidity might also occur 4 weeks earlier in twin gestations. This study examined whether twins delivered ≥ 38 weeks had a higher perinatal morbidity than twins delivered between 36 and 37.9 weeks. Methods: Two hundred and ten sets of twins (control group) delivered between 36 and 37.9 weeks were compared to 147 sets of twins (study group) delivered at ≥ 38 weeks gestational age. The two groups were analyzed for differences in maternal demographic characteristics, intrapartum factors and neonatal outcome. Results: No significant differences were detected in neonatal outcome except for an increase in the proportion of control group patients with hyperbilirubinemia and hypoglycemia. Conclusions: Twins delivered at ≥ 38 weeks have decreased perinatal morbidity compared to twins delivered at 36-37.9 weeks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)235-241
Number of pages7
JournalPrenatal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume3
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 1998

Keywords

  • Perinatal morbidity
  • Postdates
  • Twins

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Does the morbidity of twin gestations after 36 weeks increase with advancing gestational age?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this