Does Self‐Help Help? An Empirical Investigation of Scoliosis Peer Support Groups

Gregory A. Hinrichsen, Tracey A. Revenson, Marybeth Shinn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study evaluates the impact of participation in self‐help groups for people with scoliosis and their families. In a cross‐sectional study, adolescents with scoliosis, their parents, and adult scoliotics who attended scoliosis clubs (n=245) were compared with nonparticipants (n=495) who inquired about joining clubs. Although most members reported considerable satisfaction with the clubs, participation had no discernible impact on the psychosocial adjustment of the adolescent patients or their parents. Self‐help groups appeared to be most beneficial for adult patients, especially those who had undergone the most demanding medical treatment. 1985 The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-87
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Social Issues
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

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