Do not resuscitate does not mean do not treat: How palliative care and other modalities can help facilitate communication about goals of care in advanced illness

Cardinale B. Smith, Lynn Bunch O'Neill

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

A do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order is commonly used for hospitalized patients with advanced illness. It reflects only the desires of a patient once he or she suffers a full cardiopulmonary arrest. It does not reflect preferences about other forms of life-sustaining treatments. This article reviews the definition of a DNR order, describes the evidence suggesting that physicians use a DNR order in making determinations about other life-sustaining treatments, and will provide tools such as the use of palliative care consultations and combined directives in discussing overall goals of care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)460-465
Number of pages6
JournalMount Sinai Journal of Medicine
Volume75
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Keywords

  • Advanced directives
  • Do-not-rescuscitate order
  • Goals of care
  • Life-sustaining treatments
  • Palliative care

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