Displacement of submacular hemorrhage with subretinal injection of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and gas tamponade in the setting of myopic degeneration

Ryan A. Shields, Peter H. Tang, Ruwan A. Silva, Carl D. Regillo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Myopic submacular hemorrhage (SMH) usually arises from either a break in Bruch’s membrane (lacquer cracks) that damages the underlying choriocapillaris or the development of a choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM) at the sites of prior lacquer cracks.1,2 In pathologic myopia (PM), axial elongation leads to thinning of the choroid and retinal pigment epithelium, predisposing to rupture of Bruch’s membrane.3 If large hemorrhages involving the fovea are left untreated, subretinal hemorrhage and CNVM can cause devastating long-term vision loss due to irreversible retinal atrophy.4 In this video, the authors describe their technique of using a subretinal injection of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator with a concurrent gas tamponade to displace SMH.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-259
Number of pages3
JournalOphthalmic Surgery Lasers and Imaging Retina
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019
Externally publishedYes

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