Disparities in Electronically Monitored Antiretroviral Adherence and Differential Adherence Predictors in Latinx and Non-Latinx White Persons Living with HIV

Monica Rivera Mindt, Alyssa Arentoft, Kayla Tureson, Angela C. Summers, Emily P. Morris, Vanessa Guzman, Maral N. Aghvinian, Karen Alvarez, Reuben N. Robbins, Micah J. Savin, Desiree Byrd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence is vital for optimal HIV treatment. However, there is limited ART adherence research on the US Latinx population, who are at increased risk for HIV infection and worse HIV health outcomes. This study examined electronically measured ART adherence (Medication Event Monitoring System) and its association with demographic, clinical, neurocognitive, and sociocultural variables in Latinx and non-Latinx white (NLW) persons living with HIV [PLWH (N = 128)]. Latinx participants demonstrated worse adherence than NLW participants (p = 0.04). Linear regressions revealed different predictors of adherence. Among Latinx participants, recent cocaine use, stress, and, unexpectedly, higher US acculturation predicted worse adherence (ps < 0.05). Among NLW participants, recent cocaine use predicted worse adherence (p < 0.05). Intergroup comparisons within the Latinx group were not conducted due to subsample size. Thus, ethnicity, sociocultural variables, and cocaine use are important considerations for ART adherence, and poor ART adherence may be one pathway explaining worse outcomes in Latinx PLWH. Culturally tailored adherence interventions incorporating substance use treatment, acculturation, and stress management are warranted to improve health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)344-355
Number of pages12
JournalAIDS Patient Care and STDs
Volume34
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hispanic/Latinx
  • antiretroviral medication adherence
  • cognition
  • health disparities

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