Direct Comparison of Home Versus Ambulatory Defined Nocturnal Hypertension for Predicting Cardiovascular Events: The Japan Morning Surge-Home Blood Pressure (J-HOP) Study

Gontse Gratitude Mokwatsi, Satoshi Hoshide, Hiroshi Kanegae, Takeshi Fujiwara, Keita Negishi, Aletta Elisabeth Schutte, Kazuomi Kario

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

The home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) method that measures blood pressure during sleep hours was reported to be comparable to ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in measuring nighttime blood pressure and detecting nocturnal hypertension. The aim of this study was to directly compare the prognostic power of nocturnal hypertension detected by HBPM versus ABPM for predicting future cardiovascular events. We analyzed nighttime blood pressure (measured by HBPM and ABPM) data of 1005 participants who were included in the J-HOP study (Japan Morning Surge-Home Blood Pressure). During a follow-up period of 7.6±3.4 years, 80 cardiovascular disease events occurred. The majority (91.8%) of our study population were hypertensive, and 80.7% of participants were using antihypertensive medication. Nighttime home systolic blood pressure (SBP) was higher compared to nighttime ambulatory SBP (123.0±14.6 versus 120.3±14.4 mm Hg, P<0.001). Nocturnal hypertension was defined as nighttime home or ambulatory SBP of ≥120 mm Hg. The number of participants with nocturnal hypertension defined by HBPM and ABPM was 564 (56.1%) and 469 (46.7%), respectively. Nocturnal hypertension defined by HBPM was associated with increased risk of future cardiovascular events: total cardiovascular events (coronary artery disease and stroke events; 1.78 [1.00-3.15]) and stroke (2.65 [1.14-6.20]), independent of office SBP. These results were absent with nocturnal hypertension defined by ABPM. This is the first comparison prospective study illustrating that uncontrolled nocturnal hypertension defined by HBPM (independent of office SBP) is a predictor of future cardiovascular events.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)554-561
Number of pages8
JournalHypertension
Volume76
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • blood pressure
  • cardiovascular diseases
  • coronary artery disease
  • nocturnal hypertension
  • prognosis

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