Diet and lifestyle behaviour disruption related to the pandemic was varied and bidirectional among US and UK adults participating in the ZOE COVID Study

Mohsen Mazidi, Emily R. Leeming, Jordi Merino, Long H. Nguyen, Somesh Selvachandran, Joan Capdavila Pujal, Tyler Maher, Kirstin Kadé, Benjamin Murray, Mark S. Graham, Carole H. Sudre, Jonathan Wolf, Christina Hu, David A. Drew, Claire J. Steves, Sebastien Ourselin, Christopher Gardner, Tim D. Spector, Andrew T. Chan, Paul W. FranksRachel Gibson, Sarah E. Berry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Evidence of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on health behaviours in the general population is limited. In this retrospective longitudinal study including UK and US participants, we collected diet and lifestyle data pre-pandemic (896,286) and peri-pandemic (291,871) using a mobile health app, and we computed a bidirectional health behaviour disruption index. Disruption of health behaviour was higher in younger, female and socio-economically deprived participants. Loss in body weight was greater in highly disrupted individuals than in those with low disruption. There were large inter-individual changes observed in 46 health and diet behaviours measured peri-pandemic compared with pre-pandemic, but no mean change in the total population. Individuals most adherent to less healthy pre-pandemic health behaviours improved their diet quality and weight compared with those reporting healthier pre-pandemic behaviours, irrespective of relative deprivation; therefore, for a proportion of the population, the pandemic may have provided an impetus to improve health behaviours. Public policies to tackle health inequalities widened by the pandemic should continue to prioritize diet and physical activity for all, as well as more targeted approaches to support younger females and those living in economically deprived areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)957-969
Number of pages13
JournalNature Food
Volume2
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Diet and lifestyle behaviour disruption related to the pandemic was varied and bidirectional among US and UK adults participating in the ZOE COVID Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this