Die "German study on the epidemiology of Parkinson's disease with dementia" (GEPAD): Mehr als nur Parkinson

Translated title of the contribution: The German study on the epidemiology of Parkinson's disease with dementia (GEPAD): More than Parkinson

Heinz Reichmann, Günther Deuschl, Oliver Riedel, Annika Spottke, Hans Förstl, Fritz Henn, Isabella Heuser, Wolfgang Oertel, Peter Riederer, Claudia Trenkwalder, Richard Dodel, Hans Ulrich Wittchen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

It is unknown, how frequently Parkinson's disease (PD) is complicated by dementia, depression and other neuropsychiatric conditions. An epidemiologic characterisation of the situation in specialised neurologic settings is lacking. The Geman Study on the Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease with Dementia (GEPAD) is a national representative epidemiological study of n = 1,449 PD patients in n = 315 office-based neurological settings, designed to estimate the prevalence of dementia, depression and other neuropsychiatric conditions in patients with PD of all stages by using standardized clinical assessments. Results: 28.6% met DSM-IV criteria for dementia. 33.6% met criteria for depression and 61% additionally had other clinically significant psychopathological syndromes. Only 29.4% had no neuropsychiatric conditions. GEPAD reveals for the first time comprehensively that the neuropsychiatric burden of PD patients in all stages and even early stages is considerable, posing challenging questions for research and clinical management.

Translated title of the contributionThe German study on the epidemiology of Parkinson's disease with dementia (GEPAD): More than Parkinson
Original languageGerman
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalMMW Fortschritte der Medizin
Volume152
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • Depression
  • Parkinson's disease (PD)

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