Development and pilot testing of a training for bilingual community education professionals about hereditary breast and ovarian cancer among Latinas: ÁRBOLES Familiares

Susan T. Vadaparampil, Laura Moreno Botero, Lindsay Fuzzell, Jennifer Garcia, Lina Jandorf, Alejandra Hurtado-De-Mendoza, Claudia Campos-Galvan, Beth N. Peshkin, Marc D. Schwartz, Katherine Lopez, Charitcrossed D.Sign© Ricker, Katie Fiallos, Gwendolyn P. Quinn, Kristi D. Graves

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cancer health disparities remain a significant problem in the USA, compounded by lack of access to care, language barriers and systemic biases in health care. These disparities are particularly evident in areas such as genetics/genomics. For example, Latinas at high risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) have extremely low rates of genetic counseling/testing. Long-standing barriers and inequities in access to services such as genetic counseling and testing require innovative solutions. One solution can involve training community outreach and education professionals (CORE-Ps) to bridge the gap between underserved communities and genetic specialists. We sought to develop and pilot test a training program for English-Spanish bilingual CORE-Ps to reduce disparities in access to and uptake of genetic services among Latino populations. Guided by Adult Learning Theory and with input from multiple stakeholders, we developed ÁRBOLES Familiares (Family Trees), an in-person and online training program for bilingual CORE-Ps to facilitate identification, referral, and navigation of Latinas to genetic counseling/testing. We conducted a pilot test of 24 CORE-Ps recruited from across the United States and assessed knowledge, genetic literacy, and self-efficacy at baseline and follow-up. At follow-up, participants in the pilot with complete baseline and follow-up data (N = 15) demonstrated significant improvements in HBOC knowledge, genetic literacy, self-efficacy and reports of fewer barriers to identify/navigate Latinas (ps <. 05). Qualitative assessment identified ways to improve the training curriculum. Pilot results suggest ÁRBOLES is a promising approach for training CORE-Ps to identify and refer high-risk Latinas to genetic services. Next steps involve further refinement of ÁRBOLES, development of an online toolkit, and adaptation for virtual delivery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-99
Number of pages10
JournalTranslational Behavioral Medicine
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Education
  • Genetics
  • Inherited
  • Promotoras

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