Design requirements for annulus fibrosus repair: Review of forces, displacements, and material properties of the intervertebral disk and a summary of candidate hydrogels for repair

Rose G. Long, Olivia M. Torre, Warren W. Hom, Dylan J. Assael, James C. Iatridis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

65 Scopus citations

Abstract

There is currently a lack of clinically available solutions to restore functionality to the intervertebral disk (IVD) following herniation injury to the annulus fibrosus (AF). Microdiscectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure to alleviate pain caused by herniation; however, AF defects remain and can lead to accelerated degeneration and painful conditions. Currently available AF closure techniques do not restore mechanical functionality or promote tissue regeneration, and have risk of reherniation. This review determined quantitative design requirements for AF repair materials and summarized currently available hydrogels capable of meeting these design requirements by using a series of systematic PubMed database searches to yield 1500+ papers that were screened and analyzed for relevance to human lumbar in vivo measurements, motion segment behaviors, and tissue level properties. We propose a testing paradigm involving screening tests as well as more involved in situ and in vivo validation tests to efficiently identify promising biomaterials for AF repair. We suggest that successful materials must have high adhesion strength (1/40.2 MPa), match as many AF material properties as possible (e.g., approximately 1 MPa, 0. 3 MPa, and 30 MPa for compressive, shear, and tensile moduli, respectively), and have high tensile failure strain (1/465%) to advance to in situ and in vivo validation tests. While many biomaterials exist for AF repair, few undergo extensive mechanical characterization. A few hydrogels show promise for AF repair since they can match at least one material property of the AF while also adhering to AF tissue and are capable of easy implantation during surgical procedures to warrant additional optimization and validation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number021007
JournalJournal of Biomechanical Engineering
Volume138
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2016

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