Cost-effectiveness of physical activity interventions for prevention and management of cognitive decline and dementia—a systematic review

Weixin Li, Kun Woo Rafael Kim, Donglan Zhang, Bian Liu, Christine M. Dengler-Crish, Ming Wen, Lu Shi, Xi Pan, Yian Gu, Yan Li

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Although increasing physical activity (PA) has been suggested to prevent and manage cognitive decline and dementia, its economic impact on healthcare systems and society is largely unknown. This study aimed to summarize evidence on the cost-effectiveness of PA interventions to prevent and manage cognitive decline and dementia. Methods: Electronic databases, including PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, and ScienceDirect, were searched from January 2000 to July 2023. The search strategy was driven by a combination of subject-heading terms related to physical activity, cognitive function, dementia, and cost-effectiveness. Selected studies were included in narrative synthesis, and extracted data were presented in narrative and tabular forms. The risk of bias in each study was assessed using the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards and Consensus on Health Economic Criteria list. Results: Five of the 11 identified studies focused on individuals with existing dementia. Six of the 11 identified studies focused on individuals with no existing dementia, including 3 on those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 3 on those with no existing MCI or dementia. PA interventions focused on individuals with no existing dementia were found to be cost-effective compared to the control group. Findings were mixed for PA interventions implemented in individuals with existing dementia. Conclusions: PA interventions implemented before or during the early stage of cognitive impairment may be cost-effective in reducing the burden of dementia. More research is needed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of PA interventions in managing dementia. Most existing studies used short-term outcomes in evaluating the cost-effectiveness of PA interventions in the prevention and management of dementia; future research should consider adding long-term outcomes to strengthen the study design.

Original languageEnglish
Article number159
JournalAlzheimer's Research and Therapy
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2023

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Cognitive health
  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Dementia
  • Exercise

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