Correlates of nonmedical use of hydromorphone and hydrocodone: Results from a National Household Survey

Meredith Y. Smith, J. David Haddox, Michael E. Di Marino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Over the past decade, the misuse and abuse of opioid medications in the United States has risen dramatically. Although data show a substantial variation in the nonmedical use of individual opioids, relatively little is known about risk factors for the nonmedical use of specific opioid products. This study compared the prevalence and correlates of the nonmedical use of oral immediate-release hydromorphone (marketed under the brand name of Dilaudid), versus that of hydrocodone combination products using a nationally representative sample of the civilian noninstitutionalized United States population aged 12 years or older. Data were from the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. An estimated 31.3 million individuals reported lifetime nonmedical use of an opioid analgesic. Of these, 2.9 percent reported lifetime nonmedical use of Dilaudid, and 51.9 percent reported lifetime nonmedical use of hydrocodone combination products exclusive of nonmedical Dilaudid use. Nonmedical Dilaudid users were likely to be older, Caucasian, and to have reported a higher lifetime prevalence of heroin, cocaine and injection drug use, as well as nonmedical use of other opioids. Nonmedical Dilaudid users were at higher risk for engaging in more serious substance abuse-related behaviors than those who reported lifetime nonmedical use of hydrocodone combination products.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-17
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 24 Aug 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Dilaudid
  • Hydrocodone
  • Hydromorphone
  • Nonmedical use
  • Opioid analgesic abuse

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