Coronary heart disease and coronary risk factor prevalence in rural Rajasthan.

R. Gupta, H. P. Gupta, P. Keswani, S. Sharma, V. P. Gupta, K. D. Gupta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

To determine the prevalence of coronary risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD) in rural Rajasthan, 1150 randomly selected individuals in a cluster of villages in central Rajasthan have been studied. These included 805 men and 345 women. The prevalence of various coronary risk factors in the whole group were: Smoking 488 (42.4%); Diabetes (history): 5(0.4%); Alcohol intake: 146 (12.7%); Sedentary lifestyle: 797 (69.3%); Stressful life events: 48 (4.2%); Hypertension (BP > or = 140/90) 152 (13.2%); obesity (BMI > or = 27 Kg/M2): 194 (10.9%); and Truncal obesity (waist:hip > or = 0.93): 20.8%. The overall prevalence of CHD was 46.1/1000. Patients with CHD had a higher prevalence of male sex (67.9 vs 51.5%); educated persons (30.2 vs 28.8%); businessmen (13.2 vs 10.2%); smoking (47.2 vs 40.5%); sedentary lifestyle (75.5 vs 62.3%); stressful life events (7.5 vs 4.8%); and hypertension (26.4 vs 14.8%). On the other hand, persons without CHD had higher prevalence of alcohol intake (10.8 vs 7.5%); regular prayers (23.1 vs 22.6%); physically active lifestyle (37.7 vs 24.5%); obesity (13.6 vs 6.9%), and truncal obesity (21.0 vs 20.0%). The following risk factors emerged significant on statistical analysis (Odds ratio, 95% confidence intervals): male sex (1.99, 1.04 to 3.7); hypertension (2.04, 1.01 to 4.09); male smokers (1.80, 1.28 to 4.09); and sedentary lifestyle (1.86, 1.01 to 3.59). This study shows a low prevalence of CHD in rural population which is however more than previously reported studies from India.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-26
Number of pages3
JournalThe Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
Volume42
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Coronary heart disease and coronary risk factor prevalence in rural Rajasthan.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this