Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography as a Gatekeeper to Coronary Revascularization: Emphasizing Atherosclerosis Findings Beyond Stenosis

Inge J. van den Hoogen, Alexander R. van Rosendael, Fay Y. Lin, Jeroen J. Bax, Leslee J. Shaw, James K. Min

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose of Review : Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is the optimal non-invasive test to rule out coronary artery disease (CAD). Decisions to perform coronary revascularization have traditionally been based upon ischemia testing. This review summarizes the latest observations and trials evaluating the suitability of CCTA to select patients for invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and subsequent revascularization. Recent Findings: Recent data shows that beyond stenosis, whole-heart quantification and characterization of coronary atherosclerotic plaque improves the estimation of myocardial ischemia. This comprehensive evaluation of the coronary artery tree has greater diagnostic accuracy for invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) than conventional stress tests. Further, clinical trials have demonstrated that the performance of CCTA in patients with a clinical indication for ICA results in more effective patient care and significantly lower costs. Summary: Besides the excellent ability to rule out CAD, recent data shows that quantification and characterization of the coronary artery tree results in high accuracy for ischemia and that CCTA-guided care to select patients for ICA and revascularization is effective. Trials evaluating revascularization based on CCTA findings may be needed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number24
JournalCurrent Cardiovascular Imaging Reports
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Coronary artery disease
  • Coronary computed tomography angiography
  • Coronary revascularization

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