Computed tomography and magnetic resonance enterography protocols and techniques: survey of the Society of Abdominal Radiology Crohn’s Disease Disease-Focused Panel

Namita S. Gandhi, Jonathan R. Dillman, David J. Grand, Chenchan Huang, Joel G. Fletcher, Mahmoud M. Al-Hawary, Sudha A. Anupindi, Mark E. Baker, David H. Bruining, Manjil Chatterji, Jeff L. Fidler, Michael S. Gee, Joseph R. Grajo, Flavius F. Guglielmo, Tracy A. Jaffe, Seong Ho Park, Jordi Rimola, Bachir Taouli, Stuart A. Taylor, Benjamin Yeh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To survey Society of Abdominal Radiology Crohn’s Disease (CD) Disease-Focused Panel (DFP) members to understand state-of-the-art CT/MR enterography (CTE/MRE) protocols and variability between institutions. Methods: This study was determined by an institutional review board to be “exempt” research. The survey consisted of 70 questions about CTE/MRE patient preparation, administration of contrast materials, imaging techniques, and other protocol details. The survey was administered to DFP members using SurveyMonkey® (Surveymonkey.com). Descriptive statistical analyses were performed. Results: Responses were received from 16 DFP institutions (3 non-USA, 2 pediatric); 15 (94%) were academic/university-based. 10 (63%) Institutions image most CD patients with MRE; 4 (25%) use CTE and MRE equally. Hypoperistaltic medication is given for MRE at 13 (81%) institutions versus only 2 (13%) institutions for CTE. Most institutions have a technologist or nurse monitor oral contrast material drinking (n = 12 for CTE, 75%; n = 11 for MRE, 69%). 2 (13%) institutions use only dual-energy capable scanners for CTE, while 9 (56%) use either a single-energy or dual-energy scanner based on availability. Axial CTE images are reconstructed at 2–3 mm thickness at 8 (50%) institutions, > 3 mm at 5 (31%), and < 2 mm at 3 (19%) institutions. 13 (81%) institutions perform MRE on either 1.5 or 3T scanners without preference. All institutions perform MRE multiphase postcontrast imaging (median = 4 phases), ranging from 20 to 600 s after contrast material injection. Conclusion: CTE and MRE protocol knowledge from DFP institutions can help radiology practices optimize/standardize protocols, potentially improving image quality and patient outcomes, permitting objective comparisons between examinations, and facilitating research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1011-1017
Number of pages7
JournalAbdominal Radiology
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2020

Keywords

  • CT enterography
  • Crohn’s Disease-Focused Panel
  • Crohn’s disease
  • MR enterography

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Computed tomography and magnetic resonance enterography protocols and techniques: survey of the Society of Abdominal Radiology Crohn’s Disease Disease-Focused Panel'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this