Comparison of poly-L-lactic acid and calcium hydroxylapatite for treating human immunodeficiency virus-associated facial lipoatrophy

Eric S. Schweiger, Christy C. Riddle, Betsy J. Wernli, Viseslav Tonkovic-Capin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome is a condition that may affect patients with HIV infection. It is characterized by both metabolic disturbances and changes in distribution of adipose tissue, including lipoatrophy of the face. Poly-L-lactic acid and calcium hydroxylapatite are commonly used, long-lasting, nonpermanent fillers that are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat facial lipoatrophy. This article reviews the current literature on, and compares the use of, these products in HIV-associated facial lipoatrophy. Both poly-L-lactic acid and calcium hydroxylapatite appear to be safe and effective for treating HIV-associated facial lipoatrophy, and both are viable treatment options.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)304-312
Number of pages9
JournalCosmetic Dermatology
Volume20
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 2007
Externally publishedYes

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