Comparison of coronary stenting versus conventional balloon angioplasty on five-year mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention

Rajendra H. Mehta, Kishore J. Harjai, David A. Cox, Gregg W. Stone, Bruce R. Brodie, Judy Boura, Lorelei Grines, William O'Neill, Cindy L. Grines

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Little is known about the influence of stenting versus balloon angioplasty on long-term outcomes (particularly mortality) after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We evaluated 2,087 patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction enrolled in various Primary Angioplasty in Myocardial Infarction (PAMI) trials in the United States, who underwent primary PCI. The main outcome was all-cause mortality at 5 years, obtained through the National Death Index. Of the 2,087 patients, stenting was performed in 692 (33%). The absolute difference in the hospital (2.2% vs 3.3%), 1-year (3.3% vs 5.2%), and 5-year (10% vs 13%) mortality rates favored patients receiving a stent versus conventional balloon therapy, with the difference increasing with time. A multivariate Cox model identified stent use (vs balloon alone) as an independent correlate of lower 5-year mortality (hazard ratio 0.60, 95% confidence interval 0.42 to 0.85). The absolute reduction in mortality was greatest in the highest risk group. In conclusion, compared with balloon angioplasty, stenting during primary PCI not only resulted in better angiographic and short-term outcomes, but also in a sustained beneficial effect on mortality at 5 years. These data support the routine use of coronary stenting in most patients undergoing primary PCI, when feasible.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)901-906
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume96
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2005
Externally publishedYes

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