Color Doppler tissue imaging for evaluation of right ventricular systolic function in patients with congenital heart disease

Irene D. Lytrivi, Wyman W. Lai, H. Helen Ko, James C. Nielsen, Ira A. Parness, Shubhika Srivastava

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: We sought to explore the relationship of color Doppler tissue imaging-derived systolic indices of tricuspid valve annular motion and magnetic resonance imaging-derived right ventricular (RV) ejection fraction in patients with congenital heart disease. Methods: Patients with congenital heart disease who underwent echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging on the same day were included. The tricuspid valve annular color Doppler tissue imaging-derived parameters of peak velocity during isovolumic contraction, myocardial acceleration during isovolumic contraction, peak systolic velocity, and Tei index were compared with magnetic resonance imaging-derived RV ejection fraction. Results: Peak systolic velocity and myocardial acceleration during isovolumic contraction correlated well with RV ejection fraction after adjusting for age, RV dilation, and pressure overload (r = 0.65 and 0.73, respectively). Interobserver and intraobserver reliability were excellent for peak systolic velocity (r = 0.95 and 0.97, respectively) and very good for myocardial acceleration during isovolumic contraction (r = 0.93 and 0.85, respectively). Conclusions: Color Doppler tissue imaging indices of tricuspid valve annular motion are reproducible and provide a potentially useful complementary tool for assessment of RV systolic function in patients with congenital heart disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1099-1104
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Society of Echocardiography
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005
Externally publishedYes

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