Clinical utility of suicide behavior and ideation measures: Implications for military suicide risk assessment.

Peter M. Gutierrez, Thomas Joiner, Jetta Hanson, Kayla Avery, Alex Fender, Teresa Harrison, Keesha Kerns, Peter McGowan, Ian H. Stanley, Caroline Silva, Megan L. Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Public Significance Statement—This study looked at four widely used suicide risk assessment measures in a large sample of active duty U.S. service members identified through typical screening approaches to be at higher risk of suicide. It was determined that no measure is superior to any other, and that clinicians can rely on whichever of the four tools they prefer when caring for at-risk for suicide service members. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)

Original languageEnglish
JournalPsychological Assessment
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • military
  • predictive validity
  • suicide assessment

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