Clinical prognostic variables in young patients (under 40 years) with hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma

Qin Wang, Wei Luan, Gerald A. Villanueva, Nuh N. Rahbari, Herman T. Yee, Fotini Manizate, Spiros P. Hiotis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the impact of hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) screening in chronic hepatitis B patients who did not meet the current screening recommendations. METHODS: Patients who were admitted to Bellevue Hospital Center with HCC were assessed for risk factors, cirrhosis and tumor-specific factors. Eligibility for liver transplantation or resection with favorable outcome was determined by applying Milan criteria. RESULTS: In all 93 patients were diagnosed with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated HCC, 18 of whom were under 40 years. Cirrhosis was infrequently associated with HCC in this group, with most cancers occurring in non-cirrhotic patients (12/18, 66.7%). No patient developed HCC outside the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) cancer screening recommendations (young age, non-cirrhotic) were eligible for liver transplantation or resection with favorable outcomes (within Milan criteria). However, HCC patients who were diagnosed within AASLD screening recommendations did meet Milan criteria in 17.3% (14/81) patients. CONCLUSIONS: Current guidelines for HCC screening in patients with HBV may lead to a delay in diagnosis in non-cirrhotic patients under 40 years. Consideration should be given to modifying current recommendations to advocate entering HBV patients into a cancer-screening program at young age.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)214-218
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Digestive Diseases
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

Keywords

  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatocellular carcinoma
  • Viral hepatitis

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