Clinical features and psychiatric comorbidities of borderline personality disorder patients with versus without a history of suicide attempt

Leo Sher, Amanda M. Fisher, Caitlin H. Kelliher, Justin D. Penner, Marianne Goodman, Harold W. Koenigsberg, Antonia S. New, Larry J. Siever, Erin A. Hazlett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are at high risk for suicidal behavior. However, many BPD patients do not engage in suicidal behavior. In this study, we compared clinical features of BPD patients with or without a history of suicide attempts and healthy volunteers. Compared with healthy volunteers, both BPD groups had higher Affective Lability Scale (ALS), ALS – Depression-Anxiety Subscale, Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS), and Lifetime History of Aggression (LHA) scores and were more likely to have a history of temper tantrums. BPD suicide attempters had higher ALS, ALS – Depression-Anxiety Subscale and LHA scores and were more likely to have a history of non-suicidal self-injury or temper tantrums compared to BPD non-attempters. Also, BPD suicide attempters were more likely to have a history of comorbid major depressive disorder and less likely to have comorbid narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) in comparison to BPD non-attempters. About 50% of study participants in each BPD group had a history of comorbid substance use disorder (SUD). Our study indicates that BPD patients with a history of suicide attempt are more aggressive, affectively dysregulated and less narcissistic than BPD suicide non-attempters.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)261-266
Number of pages6
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume246
DOIs
StatePublished - 30 Dec 2016

Keywords

  • Affective lability
  • Borderline personality disorder
  • Depression
  • Narcissistic personality disorder
  • Suicide

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Clinical features and psychiatric comorbidities of borderline personality disorder patients with versus without a history of suicide attempt'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this