Chimeric animal and plant viruses expressing epitopes of outer membrane protein F as a combined vaccine against Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

Harry E. Gilleland, Linda B. Gilleland, John Staczek, Ronald N. Harty, Adolfo García-Sastre, Peter Palese, Frank R. Brennan, William D.O. Hamilton, Mohammed Bendahmane, Roger N. Beachy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

Outer membrane protein F of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has vaccine efficacy against infection by P. aeruginosa as demonstrated in a variety of animal models. Through the use of synthetic peptides, three surface-exposed epitopes have been identified. These are called peptides 9 (aa 261-274 in the mature F protein, TDAYNQKLSERRAN), 10 (aa 305-318, NATAEGRAINRRVE), and 18 (aa 282- 295, NEYGVEGGRVNAVG). Both the peptide 9 and 10 epitopes are protective when administered as a vaccine. In order to develop a vaccine that is suitable for use in humans, including infants with cystic fibrosis, the use of viral vector systems to present the protective epitopes has been investigated. An 11-amino acid portion of epitope 10 (AEGRAINRRVE) was successfully inserted into the antigenic B site of the hemagglutinin on the surface of influenza virus. This chimeric influenza virus protects against challenge with P. aeruginosa in the mouse model of chronic pulmonary infection. Attempts to derive a chimeric influenza virus carrying epitope 9 have been unsuccessful. A chimeric plant virus, cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), with epitopes 18 and 10 expressed in tandem on the large coat protein subunit (CPMV-PAE5) was found to elicit antibodies that reacted exclusively with the 10 epitope and not with epitope 18. Use of this chimeric virus as a vaccine afforded protection against challenge with P. aeruginosa in the mouse model of chronic pulmonary infection. Chimeric CPMVs with a single peptide containing epitopes 9 and 18 expressed on either of the coat proteins are in the process of being evaluated. Epitope 9 was successfully expressed on the coat protein of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), and this chimeric virus is protective when used as a vaccine in the mouse model of chronic pulmonary infection. However, initial attempts to express epitope 10 on the coat protein of TMV have been unsuccessful. Efforts are continuing to construct chimeric viruses that express both the 9 and 10 epitopes in the same virus vector system. Ideally, the use of a vaccine containing two epitopes of protein F is desirable in order to greatly reduce the likelihood of selecting a variant of P. aeruginosa that escapes protective antibodies in immunized humans via a mutation in a single epitope within protein F. When the chimeric influenza virus containing epitope 10 and the chimeric TMV containing epitope 9 were given together as a combined vaccine, the immunized mice produced antibodies directed toward both epitopes 9 and 10. The combined vaccine afforded protection against challenge with P. aeruginosa in the chronic pulmonary infection model at approximately the same level of efficacy as provided by the individual chimeric virus vaccines. These results prove in principle that a combined chimeric viral vaccine presenting both epitopes 9 and 10 of protein F has vaccine potential warranting continued development into a vaccine for use in humans. (C) 2000 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-297
Number of pages7
JournalFEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2000

Keywords

  • Chimeric virus vaccine
  • Cowpea mosaic virus
  • Epitope vaccine
  • Influenza virus
  • Outer membrane protein F
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa
  • Tobacco mosaic virus

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