Characterization of a newly isolated freshwater Eustigmatophyte alga capable of utilizing far-red light as its sole light source

Benjamin M. Wolf, Dariusz M. Niedzwiedzki, Nikki Cecil M. Magdaong, Robyn Roth, Ursula Goodenough, Robert E. Blankenship

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Oxygenic phototrophs typically utilize visible light (400–700 nm) to drive photosynthesis. However, a large fraction of the energy in sunlight is contained in the far-red region, which encompasses light beyond 700 nm. In nature, certain niche environments contain high levels of this far-red light due to filtering by other phototrophs, and in these environments, organisms with photosynthetic antenna systems adapted to absorbing far-red light are able to thrive. We used selective far-red light conditions to isolate such organisms in environmental samples. One cultured organism, the Eustigmatophyte alga Forest Park Isolate 5 (FP5), is able to absorb far-red light using a chlorophyll (Chl) a-containing antenna complex, and is able to grow under solely far-red light. Here we characterize the antenna system from this organism, which is able to shift the absorption of Chl a to >705 nm.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-189
Number of pages13
JournalPhotosynthesis Research
Volume135
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antenna
  • Eustigmatophyte
  • Far-red light
  • Light harvesting complex
  • Stramenopila

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