Characteristics in Addition to Size of the Contralateral Hand Predict Hand Volume but Are Not Clinically Useful

Rasa Vasiliauskas, Marcel Dijkers, Michelle Buda Abela, Lynne Lundgren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Traditionally, therapists who treat hand edema have used the volume of the contralateral hand to estimate normal or pre-injury hand volume. This presupposes that for the average person the difference in volumes between the two hands is so small that it is clinically insignificant. Left and right hand volumes, as well as a number of other hand characteristics, and health history were collected for a sample of 512 persons. Over 15% of the subjects had a measured volume difference of 30 ml or more. The difference in absolute and relative volumes between hands was minimally affected by gender, age, lifestyle, hand dominance, size of the largest hand, health problems, or previous hand injuries. Regression analysis uncovered a number of characteristics, including gender, handedness, and age, that predicted hand volume over and above the contralateral hand, but they boosted the proportion of variance explained only from 0.968 to 0.973, a clinically insignificant increase. It was concluded that the traditional methods of estimating pre-injury volume are still useful.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)258-263
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Hand Therapy
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Characteristics in Addition to Size of the Contralateral Hand Predict Hand Volume but Are Not Clinically Useful'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this