3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: We assessed associations between maternal stress, social support, and child resiliency during the COVID-19 pandemic in relation to changes in anxiety and depression symptoms in children in Mexico City. Methods: Participants included 464 mother-child pairs from a longitudinal birth cohort in Mexico City. At ages 8–11 (pre-COVID, 2018–2019) and 9–12 (during COVID, May–Nov 2020) years, depressive symptoms were assessed using the child and parent-reported Children’s Depressive Inventory. Anxiety symptoms were assessed using the child-reported Revised Manifest Anxiety Scale. Linear regression models were used to estimate associations between maternal stress, social support, and resiliency in relation to changes in depressive and anxiety symptoms. We additionally assessed outcomes using clinically relevant cut-points. Models were adjusted for child age and sex and maternal socioeconomic status and age. Results: Higher continuous maternal stress levels during the COVID-19 pandemic were associated with increases in depressive symptoms (β: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.12, 1.31), and higher odds of clinically relevant depressive and anxiety symptoms in the children. Conclusions: Maternal stress during the pandemic may increase mental health symptoms in pre-adolescent children. Additional studies are needed that examine the long-term pandemic-related impacts on mental health throughout the adolescent years. Impact: In this longitudinal cohort study of children in Mexico City, we observed that depressive symptoms were higher from before to during the pandemic.Maternal stress surrounding the pandemic may increase mental health symptoms in pre-adolescent children.Child resiliency may help to protect against pandemic-related stressors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)349-355
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Research
Volume94
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2023

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