Cerebellar pathology and disability worsening in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: A retrospective analysis from the CombiRx trial

Maria Petracca, Gary Cutter, Sirio Cocozza, Leorah Freeman, John Kangarlu, Monica Margoni, Matteo Moro, Stephen Krieger, Mohamed Mounir El Mendili, Amgad Droby, Jerry S. Wolinsky, Fred Lublin, Matilde Inglese

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1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and purpose: Cerebellar damage is a valuable predictor of disability, particularly in progressive multiple sclerosis. It is not clear if it could be an equally useful predictor of motor disability worsening in the relapsing-remitting phenotype. Aim: We aimed to determine whether cerebellar damage is an equally useful predictor of motor disability worsening in the relapsing-remitting phenotype. Methods: Cerebellar lesion loads and volumes were estimated using baseline magnetic resonance imaging from the CombiRx trial (n = 838). The relationship between cerebellar damage and time to disability worsening (confirmed disability progression [CDP], timed 25-foot walk test [T25FWT] score worsening, nine-hole peg test [9HPT] score worsening) was tested in stagewise and stepwise Cox proportional hazards models, accounting for demographics and supratentorial damage. Results: Shorter time to 9HPT score worsening was associated with higher baseline Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score (hazard ratio [HR] 1.408, p = 0.0042) and higher volume of supratentorial and cerebellar T2 lesions (HR 1.005 p = 0.0196 and HR 2.211, p = 0.0002, respectively). Shorter time to T25FWT score worsening was associated with higher baseline EDSS (HR 1.232, p = 0.0006). Shorter time to CDP was associated with older age (HR 1.026, p = 0.0010), lower baseline EDSS score (HR 0.428, p < 0.0001) and higher volume of supratentorial T2 lesions (HR 1.024, p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Among the explored outcomes, single time-point evaluation of cerebellar damage only allows the prediction of manual dexterity worsening. In clinical studies the selection of imaging biomarkers should be informed by the outcome of interest.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)515-521
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Neurology
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2022

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