Can laparoscopic surgery prevent incisional hernia in patients with Crohn’s disease: a comparison study of 750 patients undergoing open and laparoscopic bowel resection

Tomas M. Heimann, Santosh Swaminathan, Adrian J. Greenstein, Alexander J. Greenstein, Sergey Khaitov, Randolph M. Steinhagen, Barry A. Salky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Incisional hernia (IH) is a frequent occurrence following open surgery for Crohn’s disease (CD). This study compares the IH rates of patients with CD undergoing open versus laparoscopic bowel resection. Methods: Seven hundred and fifty patients with CD operated by the authors at the Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, USA, were reviewed from a prospectively maintained surgical database. Five hundred patients with Crohn’s disease undergoing open surgery were compared to 250 patients undergoing laparoscopic bowel resection. Results: The mean duration of follow-up in the study population was 6.8 years. Patients undergoing open surgery had a significantly higher age at onset of disease, age at surgery, longer duration of disease, lower serum albumin, history of multiple previous resections, were more likely to be on steroids, needed more blood transfusions, and had an increased necessity for an ileostomy during resection. Nevertheless, the incidence of IH at 36 months was nearly identical in both groups (10.8 vs. 8.4% for open vs laparoscopic). 16% of the patients in the laparoscopic group (range: 7–20%) required conversion to open surgery. Patients undergoing laparoscopic resection that required conversion to open surgery had the highest IH rate at 18%. There was a significant correlation between IH and the length of the midline vertical extraction incision. Patients undergoing laparoscopic resection with intracorporeal anastomosis and small transverse or trocar site extraction incisions had no IH. Conclusions: A marked decrease or complete elimination of IH in patients with CD undergoing bowel resection may be possible using advanced laparoscopic techniques that require intra-abdominal anastomosis and use of the smallest transverse extraction incisions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5201-5208
Number of pages8
JournalSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques
Volume31
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • Bowel resection
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Incisional hernia
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Intracorporeal anastomosis
  • Laparoscopic surgery

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Can laparoscopic surgery prevent incisional hernia in patients with Crohn’s disease: a comparison study of 750 patients undergoing open and laparoscopic bowel resection'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this