Body trust as a moderator of the association between exercise dependence and suicidality

Mary E. Duffy, Megan L. Rogers, Thomas E. Joiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Exercise dependence and interoceptive deficits, particularly low body trust, have been associated with suicidality. This study tested whether low body trust predicted current suicidal ideation and past suicide attempts in individuals exhibiting symptoms of exercise dependence. Methods: 540 individuals (55.6% female, mean age 36) recruited via MTurk completed online measures of exercise dependence, interoception, and history of suicidal ideation and attempts. Results: Exercise dependence symptoms and low body trust were associated with suicidal ideation. Body trust moderated the relationship between exercise dependence symptoms and suicidal ideation. Continuance in exercise despite adverse consequences and low body trust were associated with past suicide attempts. Conclusions: Body trust was associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in individuals with exercise dependence symptoms, and the associations strengthened as body trust decreased. The experience of not trusting one's own body may exacerbate suicide risk in at-risk individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-35
Number of pages6
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume85
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2018
Externally publishedYes

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