B-cell deficiency does not abrogate development of cutaneous hyperplasia in mice inheriting the defective fibrillin-1 gene

Kuppuswamy N. Kasturi, Akira Hatakeyama, Chihiro Murai, Ronald Gordon, Robert G. Phelps, Constantin A. Bona

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Tight-skin (TSK) mouse, the experimental model for scleroderma, develops cutaneous hyperplasia, cardiac hypertrophy, pulmonary emphysema and autoimmunity against scleroderma target autoantigens. The cutaneous hyperplasia is associated with the accumulation of microfibrils and elastic fibers in the middle and deep dermis. Fibrillin-1 (Fbn-1) is a major component of the 10-12 nm microfibrils found in the extracellular matrix. In this study we report the identification of a genetic marker in the Fbn-1 gene that can distinguish the mutant phenotype. TSK mice exhibit an unique polymorphism in the Fbn-1 gene. RNA analysis, PCR analysis and sequence determination of the mutant gene showed that the Fbn-1 gene polymorphism is due to intragenic duplication of a segment of the gene coding for 3.0 Kb of mRNA sequence (10 Kb of the genome). Histological analysis of skin samples from F1 progeny obtained by crossing TSK mice with J(H)-/-, RAG2-/- or vit/vit showed a significant correlation between the inheritance of the defective Fbn-1 gene and the development of cutaneous hyperplasia. Further, our results also show that in mice deficient in mature B cells inheriting the defective Fbn-1 gene, development of cutaneous hyperplasia is not abrogated. Thus, production of autoantibodies or the presence of mature B lymphocytes do not play an integral role in the pathogenesis of cutaneous hyperplasia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)505-517
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Autoimmunity
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1997

Keywords

  • B-cell-deficient mice
  • Cutaneous hyperplasia
  • Fibrillin-1
  • Tight-skin mouse

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