Attitudes Toward Peer-Delivered Sexual-Health Services Among New York City Sexual and Gender Minority Individuals Who Have Sex with Men and Attend Collective Sex Venues

Étienne Meunier, Daniel Alohan, Stephen Tellone, Richard Silvera, Alwyn Cohall, Adam Baran, Michael Wakefield, Christian Grov, Celia B. Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Collective sex venues such as sex clubs are strategic sites to promote sexual health among sexual and gender minority individuals. We present qualitative findings from a multiple-method study on the acceptability of sexual-health services at collective sex venues in New York City (NYC) among attendees who identified as men, transgender, or gender non-conforming. In a survey used for sample selection (n = 342), most respondents (82.7%) agreed that “having outreach workers at sex venues is a good thing.” Interviewees (n = 30) appreciated how on-site services could promote sexual health in their community. They felt peer workers should be familiar with collective sex venues and share demographic characteristics with attendees. Some participants felt workers should keep some boundaries from attendees, while others felt they could be fully integrated in the environment, suggesting that either peer outreach or popular-opinion leader types of interventions could be feasible.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1167-1184
Number of pages18
JournalQualitative Health Research
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2022

Keywords

  • HIV/STI prevention
  • collective sex venues
  • gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men
  • peer-based work
  • sexual health
  • transgender and gender nonconforming individuals

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